GIF: Lightning goal disallowed for goaltender interference

Apr 20, 9:34 PM

The Tampa Bay Lightning appeared to take a 2-1 lead late in the second period of Game 3 against the Montreal Canadiens on Sunday, but the goal was disallowed by referee Francis Charron due to goaltender interference.

Lightning forward Alex Killorn plowed into the goal earlier in the play and was impeded from exiting the net by Canadiens defenseman P.K. Subban. Once Killorn can regain his footing, Price moves across the crease and the players make minor contact.

Price then slides outside his own crease and knocks the puck into his own net when scrambling back across 3-4 seconds after the contact with Killorn:

[Courtesy: CBC]

The call was made based on rule 69.3, which states:

If a goalkeeper, in the act of establishing his position within his goal crease, initiates contact with an attacking player who is in the goal crease, and this results in an impairment of the goalkeeper’s ability to defend his goal, and a goal is scored, the goal will be disallowed.

Feature photo courtesy of Jean-Yves Ahern / USA Today

Apr 20, 10:54 PM

Lightning head coach fuming after disallowed goal decision

Apr 20, 10:54 PM

To no one's surprise, Tampa Bay Lightning head coach Jon Cooper was still upset after the game with referee Francis Charron's decision to disallow a crucial goal.

The play occurred in the second period of the Lightning's 3-2 loss to the Montreal Canadiens in Game 3 at the Bell Centre and Cooper expressed his displeasure with the decision during his post-game comments.

He followed that comment with a tongue-in-cheek statement regarding the Lightning's goal total.

The only thing Cooper admired about Charron's decision was his unwillingness to waiver on the call.

The goal would have given the Lightning a 2-1 lead on the Canadiens, but instead they find themselves trailing the best-of-seven series 3-0 and face the same daunting task of playing the Canadiens on their home ice on Tuesday night.

See the controversial call below

Feature photo courtesy of Jean-Yves Ahern / USA Today